Brand Ambassadors – What They Are and Why They are Important

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The latest trend in communicating with college consumers, and perhaps one of the most effective ways, is implementing a brand ambassador program. Brand ambassadors are not limited to big brand names – in fact, many startup businesses and other small businesses can spread the word about their company most efficiently through them. Why are they so effective? It is because people love brand ambassadors.

What is a brand ambassador?

There are two types. The first is a well-known or famous individual who is paid to represent or be the face of a particular brand. However, brands are now focused on bloggers, YouTubers, Instagrammers to sponsor their content, because they know they have followers and influence over their target market. The second type is people who mention or represent your brand for free, or on a non cash basis. Being a brand ambassador is attractive for college students because they want a long-term relationship with your company, free extras and an inside-know how into your company.

Why are brand ambassadors important?

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According to the Social Media Revolution, 78% of consumers trust recommendations from their peers before purchasing a product. The power of brand ambassadors comes to play here. If the target audience realizes that the person promoting the brand and talking it up is not getting paid to spread positive word about it, they are more likely to trust and follow their advice. Additionally, brand ambassadors assist in building your brand image on college campuses. A real person, especially another college student, recommending a brand voluntarily will create a positive message about your brand, and help to achieve awareness on campus.

For more information on how to start your brand ambassador marketing strategy for the upcoming back to school season, contact us at OnCampus Advertising

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