Don’t Forget Summer College Students

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When one thinks of college, the path includes a fall semester, winter break, spring semester, and summer break – then graduating after 4 years. However, it is very common for a person to take more than 4 years to earn a degree. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, only 32% of full-time students graduate in 4 years. Many obstacles can deter a person from the fast track of 4 years, such as failing a class, studying abroad, switching majors, or transferring schools. So what can students do to ensure the possibility of graduating in 4 years? The answer is summer classes.

A variety of perks come with summer classes. Azusa Pacific University recently did a study on summer classes which provide pros such as: earlier graduation date, lower tuition, easier parking, a lighter course load and five week commitment.

Angie Di Claudio, director of Integrated Enrollment Services, says, “[Summer school] is also a great opportunity for students to get on track, stay on track or progress more quickly to graduation.”

Senior, Joseph Parker, says, “Summer classes are great because you can get them out of the way in a month’s time. If you are looking for a quick route to graduation, summer courses are the way to go.”

Sam Allis writes in an article on Boston.Com, “There are more students flocking to summer schools these days. Enrollment has been inching up in the last decade, as have the number of summer course offerings at many schools. “

The number of students who participate in summer classes is steadily growing. They are still a prime group of people to target and market towards. Summer classes allow the college market demographic to have additional chances to advertise. This is a perfect time to Out-of-Home, Digital, and Mobile campaigns.

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