Hit the Email Marketing Sweet Spot with College Students

Email Marketing

While it may seem like college students are constantly on their smartphones, that doesn’t necessarily mean they are checking their email every second of the day. As a marketer, it is important to know when to send an email, what to include in it and how to optimize click-through rate. In a study conducted by Senditblue, 63% of respondents said email was their number one choice of communication with retailers, with only 14% choosing text messaging. The research on this study revealed insights into what college students like and dislike from marketers.

 

  1. Retailers: give them what they want

Seventy-five percent of college aged respondents said perks like free shipping and 2-day delivery are the main drivers of product and brand loyalty. Additionally, 59% will take action from emails that contain a site-wide or product-category wide promotional offer.

  1. How to walk the fine line

Sixty-eight percent said they check their email at least 2-5 times a day, and their inboxes can get bombarded with promotional emails. It is important for marketers to know to use the power of email, but not abuse it. Over 55% of respondents said retailers who spam their inbox are more likely to lose customer loyalty and respect.

  1. Knowing the sweet spot

The majority of college students want to engage with retailers through email to get discounts and promotional offers. Clear and quality communication is important. Additionally, the majority of college students said they will pull up an email when browsing in a physical store to access coupons and deals. This emphasizes email’s role as the bridge between online and in-store shopping.

 

In conclusion, college students are a unique group of consumers who know exactly what they want from retailers. In order to let your college customers know their voices are heard, deliver on your promises, be authentic in your communication.

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